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Ghost Cities encourage us to ask more questions as opposed to arriving at conclusions: “Who built this city?” and “Why has no one occupied it in so long?”

When we think of cities, we often think of a buzzing metropolis, streets with entrepreneurs and merchants trying to make their mark on the world. Perhaps, we think of all the individuals in street traffic or the subway making their way to the office. Regardless of what city you’re from, we don’t often imagine cities without the people who power them. …


Exploring Liminal Spaces with Japan Based Magazine, Sabukaru

Liminal spaces are those weird, atmospheric, and sometimes eerie places, that look like the gateway to another realm.

In fact, they’re a bit hard to explain, prompting discussions about what constitutes a “liminal space”.

What we do know for sure, Liminal Spaces are the spaces in-between where you are and where you want to be.

Liminal Spaces are the loading zone…

This article is part of the on-going series “for sabukaru”. Examining the intersection of art, information and aesthetics, RAMCPU shares his uniquely critical perspective on contemporary art and media to shape…


35 Important Things to Remember about Curating

Cover.

I recently read the book; Culture of Curating and The Curating of Culture(s) by Paul O’Neill. It's a really amazing, succinct, dense, and explorative journey into the world of curating and its implications in a cultural and sociological context.

O’Neill examines just how the arts and the methodology of curating may influence our perspective of culture, institutions, and what we believe to be possible in the arts.

Paul O’Neill guides us through the conflicting claims that surround the development of curating as an implicated set of roles. Focusing on the debates and differences…


Why the Kids Today Still Need to Play SNES and SEGA Genesis

Todays generation is the internet generation….

….They need a reason to reference the past. To say, “learn your history” is just not enough- for they will never see themselves as being a part of history. Kids will study history as something outside of themselves; completely detached.

In order for young people to learn history, and utilize their technologies, not as toys, but as tools of learning , they must see themselves in history and see the future’s potential within historical contexts.


or How Colonial Powers are Forced to Adapt to the Beat of Hip-Hop

Fab 5 Freddy, Spike Lee, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Andy Warhol

Historically, when outsider institutions colonize, they don’t merely occupy the land of the locals, exploiting them through material and physical force; they also commodify and colonize the ideas and arts of the native people. Through institutional bodies like museums, for example, artifacts are stolen and recontextualized, new names for the natives and enforced, and alternative ideological, religious, and political systems are installed by the colonizer.

These new systems, names, languages are established to colonize a people’s minds through a process of de-linking; this “de-linking”, among other things…


or How Gamers can Control their Future…

Perhaps the most notable points of interest concerning arcades pertain to the very word itself.

The term “arcade” contains the french root “arc” relating to an “arch” or “bow: This would make sense when we think of the first Arcades, being simply a series of arches within an architectural structure. You may have noticed these repeated arches or arcades in the Colosseum of ancient Rome or perhaps you saw them in your local mosque or church.

Not only does the “arcade” relate to architecture but were later used to describe that of Shopping…


Fighting games are inherently tactical and hands-on. Not only do these games encourage incredible reflexes and adaptation, but they also encourage players to solve a problem head-on, communicate with the opponent as well as the boundaries within the arena.


How Arcade Cabinets Are Machines For Time Travel

Stanley Kubrick’s 1968 film “2001: A Space Odyssey” is as symbolic as it is a masterpiece. The most memorable icon in the film (and perhaps the most memorable icon in film history) is The Monolith; a giant rectangular machine built by an alien species that when in contact with humanoids- motivates them to progress in technology and the science of time travel.

This slab is reminiscent of the rectangular smartphones that we all carry with us everywhere we go. …


The Past is The Key to The Future

Perhaps the most notable points of interest concerning arcades pertain to the very word itself.

The term “arcade” contains the french root “arc” relating to an “arch” or “bow: This would make sense when we think of the first Arcades, being simply a series of arches within an architectural structure. You may have noticed these repeated arches or arcades in the Colosseum of ancient Rome or perhaps you saw them in your local mosque or church.

Not only does the “arcade” relate to architecture but were later used to describe that of…


Tekken 2 (1995)

Brilliantly, the Tekken team was able to tell a fascinating story in just 30 seconds without any dialogue. The Tekken 2 (1996) Armor King Cinematic Ending is revealed after completing the game’s arcade mode- I don’t want to over explain the cinematic, just watch the short clip on the left.

Basically, in just a few short shots, they are able to really add dramatic character to the mythos of Armor King. First and foremost, notice the color and shadows of the environment…notice the minimal usage of sound. Here they show us less is more.

This dramatization was apparent in…

RAMCPU

Aesthetics and Culture — ramcpu.carrd.com

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